Lake Qargha 9km from Kabul, makes a great afternoon getaway from the city. Quarga is a man-made lake created by the damming of the Kabul river and is a lovely recreational place for Afghans with clean water for swimming, paddle boats, motor boats and places for families to gather and picnic.
 Lake Qargha 9km from Kabul, makes a great afternoon getaway from the city. Quarga is a man-made lake created by the damming of the Kabul river and is a lovely recreational place for Afghans with clean water for swimming, paddle boats, motor boats and places for families to gather and picnic.
 A man sells old corn-on-the-cob  in the Macroyan 2 evening market while women behind him peruse the used clothing stands. Macroyan is known as one of the more progressive neighborhoods where the middle-class live in soviet style apartment complexes.
 A father and son metalworking team work in downtown Kabul. The rate for skilled labor is 5 dollars a day and trades are traditionally handed down through the family.
 A burka clad woman purchases a calf head for a soup in a busy market near the Old City of Kabul, Afghanistan.
 Kabul children, off for winter vacation play in the snow of the Shohadaie Saliheen Cemetery of Kabul, Afghanistan. Interestingly cemeteries are very social places in Afghanistan and are common for recreation.
 Children play Carambol in Cinema Park in Kabul. Mavid, age 12 right is playing Ravi, age 6. Though Ravi is the youngest and smallest player he has won his fifth straight game.
 Kabul City Center, Afghanistan's first modern shopping center is a nine stories tall in the posh section of Shar-e-now, Kabul Afghanistan. Security is heavy and shoppers are profiled, and must be well-heeled to be allowed entrance.
 Children play on the grass at Bagh-e Babur historic park in Kabul Afghanistan while mothers watch nearby. The park is also the last resting-place of the first Mughal emperor Babur.
 A man feeds the birds outside of a mosque near the Kabul River in the old city of Kabul, Afghanistan.
 Yama Ismail plays Snooker at Target Game Zone in Haki Yqoob Square, Kabul Afghanistan. Snooker is a popular game for upper-class afghanis. The Snooker halls come alive after work hours are over also Tournaments are very popular.
 Boys and men play football in an empty pool at the top of Wazir Akbahan Hill. The pool was built by the soviets during their short occupation. Kabul, Afghanistan.
 A Hazara girl and her mother visit a cemetery in Kabul, Afghanistan. Thursday evening's is the traditional time to visit cemeteries as it is the night before Friday- the traditional holy day for Muslims.
 Girls visit a Shrine near Karga Lake outside of Kabul, Afghanistan.
 A sikh medicine man in his shop in downtown Kabul, Afghanistan.
LesserSeen-16.JPG
 A sikh girl plays with her little brother in Kabul, Afghanistan. Many Sikh's including boys don't attend school in Afghanistan as they are marginalized in the community. Homeschooling is not an option as many parents have not attended schooling either.
 A deaf man prays at the grave for his relative.
 A man in traditional dress in a market in downtown Kabul. Most markets are unorganized and unregulated in Kabul as many salesmen cannot afford shops.
 A car wash in the Kart-E Sakhi section of Kabul Afghanistan. It costs 150 AFS (roughly 3.00 USD) to wash a car in Kabul. The workers earn about 600 AFS or 12 dollars a day and work year round despite the sub-zero temperatures.
 Girls play volleyball in the Olympic Stadium's Women's Gym in Kabul Afghanistan. The girls come three times a week to play volleyball against each other as there is no other team in the country. Coach Abdul Hamid Sufi says that the girls are more interested in volleyball than the boys, and volunteer's his time as the Afghan government does not support the women's team.
 Afghan youth supporters of Dr. Abdullah Abdullah at a political rally at the Kabul Stadium in Kabul Afghanistan on August 17th, 2009. the country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.
 Afghans vote at schools across Kabul Afghanistan on August 20th, 2009. the country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.
 Girls on the street in the upscale Shar-e-now section of Kabul. There are many restaurants in the area featuring separate seating sections for men and women.
 A Hazara funeral in Kabul, Afghanistan. In Afghanistan and most Muslim countries it is required to bury the dead before sunset and family members assist in the burial. Only men attend the event and women mourn at home.
 A Hazara funeral in Kabul, Afghanistan. In Afghanistan and most Muslim countries it is required to bury the dead before sunset. Only men attend the burial and women mourn at home.  The man on the left is the deceased son.
 Day laborers wait outside the Pashto Market in downtown Kabul hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out  the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.
 Day laborers fight for the chance to work with a contractor outside the Pashto Market in downtown Kabul hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out  the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.
 Suffroz (right) and his assistant wait outside the Pashto market in downtown Kabul, hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.
 A workers son wets the rocks to cut down on dust and works on other small tasks around the construction site. Many male children are brought to work sites to assist their fathers. Day Laborer's chosen to work on rebuilding a house in  Kabul.
 Day Laborer's chosen to build a wall in Kabul Afghanistan. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out  the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.
 Sanangon, from Mazar Sharif lays rock in a trench that will be the foundation of the house in Kabul.The entire construction of the house will be done by unregulated labor.
 A man wades out of a pool while beign watched by an Afghan National Police man. Heightened security in Kabul the night before the election on Soviet Hill in Kabul Afghanistan, August 19th, 2009. The country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.
 Afghans gather on a Friday on Nadir Shah Hill, or Kite Hill- to fly paper kites and battle others in a traditional match. When a Kite is cut children with long brooms have to catch the kites before their prize blows away. Kite flying is a popular recreation for Afghan children
 Lake Qargha 9km from Kabul, makes a great afternoon getaway from the city. Quarga is a man-made lake created by the damming of the Kabul river and is a lovely recreational place for Afghans with clean water for swimming, paddle boats, motor boats and places for families to gather and picnic.

Lake Qargha 9km from Kabul, makes a great afternoon getaway from the city. Quarga is a man-made lake created by the damming of the Kabul river and is a lovely recreational place for Afghans with clean water for swimming, paddle boats, motor boats and places for families to gather and picnic.

 Lake Qargha 9km from Kabul, makes a great afternoon getaway from the city. Quarga is a man-made lake created by the damming of the Kabul river and is a lovely recreational place for Afghans with clean water for swimming, paddle boats, motor boats and places for families to gather and picnic.

Lake Qargha 9km from Kabul, makes a great afternoon getaway from the city. Quarga is a man-made lake created by the damming of the Kabul river and is a lovely recreational place for Afghans with clean water for swimming, paddle boats, motor boats and places for families to gather and picnic.

 A man sells old corn-on-the-cob  in the Macroyan 2 evening market while women behind him peruse the used clothing stands. Macroyan is known as one of the more progressive neighborhoods where the middle-class live in soviet style apartment complexes.

A man sells old corn-on-the-cob in the Macroyan 2 evening market while women behind him peruse the used clothing stands. Macroyan is known as one of the more progressive neighborhoods where the middle-class live in soviet style apartment complexes.

 A father and son metalworking team work in downtown Kabul. The rate for skilled labor is 5 dollars a day and trades are traditionally handed down through the family.

A father and son metalworking team work in downtown Kabul. The rate for skilled labor is 5 dollars a day and trades are traditionally handed down through the family.

 A burka clad woman purchases a calf head for a soup in a busy market near the Old City of Kabul, Afghanistan.

A burka clad woman purchases a calf head for a soup in a busy market near the Old City of Kabul, Afghanistan.

 Kabul children, off for winter vacation play in the snow of the Shohadaie Saliheen Cemetery of Kabul, Afghanistan. Interestingly cemeteries are very social places in Afghanistan and are common for recreation.

Kabul children, off for winter vacation play in the snow of the Shohadaie Saliheen Cemetery of Kabul, Afghanistan. Interestingly cemeteries are very social places in Afghanistan and are common for recreation.

 Children play Carambol in Cinema Park in Kabul. Mavid, age 12 right is playing Ravi, age 6. Though Ravi is the youngest and smallest player he has won his fifth straight game.

Children play Carambol in Cinema Park in Kabul. Mavid, age 12 right is playing Ravi, age 6. Though Ravi is the youngest and smallest player he has won his fifth straight game.

 Kabul City Center, Afghanistan's first modern shopping center is a nine stories tall in the posh section of Shar-e-now, Kabul Afghanistan. Security is heavy and shoppers are profiled, and must be well-heeled to be allowed entrance.

Kabul City Center, Afghanistan's first modern shopping center is a nine stories tall in the posh section of Shar-e-now, Kabul Afghanistan. Security is heavy and shoppers are profiled, and must be well-heeled to be allowed entrance.

 Children play on the grass at Bagh-e Babur historic park in Kabul Afghanistan while mothers watch nearby. The park is also the last resting-place of the first Mughal emperor Babur.

Children play on the grass at Bagh-e Babur historic park in Kabul Afghanistan while mothers watch nearby. The park is also the last resting-place of the first Mughal emperor Babur.

 A man feeds the birds outside of a mosque near the Kabul River in the old city of Kabul, Afghanistan.

A man feeds the birds outside of a mosque near the Kabul River in the old city of Kabul, Afghanistan.

 Yama Ismail plays Snooker at Target Game Zone in Haki Yqoob Square, Kabul Afghanistan. Snooker is a popular game for upper-class afghanis. The Snooker halls come alive after work hours are over also Tournaments are very popular.

Yama Ismail plays Snooker at Target Game Zone in Haki Yqoob Square, Kabul Afghanistan. Snooker is a popular game for upper-class afghanis. The Snooker halls come alive after work hours are over also Tournaments are very popular.

 Boys and men play football in an empty pool at the top of Wazir Akbahan Hill. The pool was built by the soviets during their short occupation. Kabul, Afghanistan.

Boys and men play football in an empty pool at the top of Wazir Akbahan Hill. The pool was built by the soviets during their short occupation. Kabul, Afghanistan.

 A Hazara girl and her mother visit a cemetery in Kabul, Afghanistan. Thursday evening's is the traditional time to visit cemeteries as it is the night before Friday- the traditional holy day for Muslims.

A Hazara girl and her mother visit a cemetery in Kabul, Afghanistan. Thursday evening's is the traditional time to visit cemeteries as it is the night before Friday- the traditional holy day for Muslims.

 Girls visit a Shrine near Karga Lake outside of Kabul, Afghanistan.

Girls visit a Shrine near Karga Lake outside of Kabul, Afghanistan.

 A sikh medicine man in his shop in downtown Kabul, Afghanistan.

A sikh medicine man in his shop in downtown Kabul, Afghanistan.

LesserSeen-16.JPG
 A sikh girl plays with her little brother in Kabul, Afghanistan. Many Sikh's including boys don't attend school in Afghanistan as they are marginalized in the community. Homeschooling is not an option as many parents have not attended schooling either.

A sikh girl plays with her little brother in Kabul, Afghanistan. Many Sikh's including boys don't attend school in Afghanistan as they are marginalized in the community. Homeschooling is not an option as many parents have not attended schooling either.

 A deaf man prays at the grave for his relative.

A deaf man prays at the grave for his relative.

 A man in traditional dress in a market in downtown Kabul. Most markets are unorganized and unregulated in Kabul as many salesmen cannot afford shops.

A man in traditional dress in a market in downtown Kabul. Most markets are unorganized and unregulated in Kabul as many salesmen cannot afford shops.

 A car wash in the Kart-E Sakhi section of Kabul Afghanistan. It costs 150 AFS (roughly 3.00 USD) to wash a car in Kabul. The workers earn about 600 AFS or 12 dollars a day and work year round despite the sub-zero temperatures.

A car wash in the Kart-E Sakhi section of Kabul Afghanistan. It costs 150 AFS (roughly 3.00 USD) to wash a car in Kabul. The workers earn about 600 AFS or 12 dollars a day and work year round despite the sub-zero temperatures.

 Girls play volleyball in the Olympic Stadium's Women's Gym in Kabul Afghanistan. The girls come three times a week to play volleyball against each other as there is no other team in the country. Coach Abdul Hamid Sufi says that the girls are more interested in volleyball than the boys, and volunteer's his time as the Afghan government does not support the women's team.

Girls play volleyball in the Olympic Stadium's Women's Gym in Kabul Afghanistan. The girls come three times a week to play volleyball against each other as there is no other team in the country. Coach Abdul Hamid Sufi says that the girls are more interested in volleyball than the boys, and volunteer's his time as the Afghan government does not support the women's team.

 Afghan youth supporters of Dr. Abdullah Abdullah at a political rally at the Kabul Stadium in Kabul Afghanistan on August 17th, 2009. the country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.

Afghan youth supporters of Dr. Abdullah Abdullah at a political rally at the Kabul Stadium in Kabul Afghanistan on August 17th, 2009. the country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.

 Afghans vote at schools across Kabul Afghanistan on August 20th, 2009. the country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.

Afghans vote at schools across Kabul Afghanistan on August 20th, 2009. the country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.

 Girls on the street in the upscale Shar-e-now section of Kabul. There are many restaurants in the area featuring separate seating sections for men and women.

Girls on the street in the upscale Shar-e-now section of Kabul. There are many restaurants in the area featuring separate seating sections for men and women.

 A Hazara funeral in Kabul, Afghanistan. In Afghanistan and most Muslim countries it is required to bury the dead before sunset and family members assist in the burial. Only men attend the event and women mourn at home.

A Hazara funeral in Kabul, Afghanistan. In Afghanistan and most Muslim countries it is required to bury the dead before sunset and family members assist in the burial. Only men attend the event and women mourn at home.

 A Hazara funeral in Kabul, Afghanistan. In Afghanistan and most Muslim countries it is required to bury the dead before sunset. Only men attend the burial and women mourn at home.  The man on the left is the deceased son.

A Hazara funeral in Kabul, Afghanistan. In Afghanistan and most Muslim countries it is required to bury the dead before sunset. Only men attend the burial and women mourn at home. The man on the left is the deceased son.

 Day laborers wait outside the Pashto Market in downtown Kabul hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out  the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

Day laborers wait outside the Pashto Market in downtown Kabul hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

 Day laborers fight for the chance to work with a contractor outside the Pashto Market in downtown Kabul hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out  the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

Day laborers fight for the chance to work with a contractor outside the Pashto Market in downtown Kabul hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

 Suffroz (right) and his assistant wait outside the Pashto market in downtown Kabul, hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

Suffroz (right) and his assistant wait outside the Pashto market in downtown Kabul, hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

 A workers son wets the rocks to cut down on dust and works on other small tasks around the construction site. Many male children are brought to work sites to assist their fathers. Day Laborer's chosen to work on rebuilding a house in  Kabul.

A workers son wets the rocks to cut down on dust and works on other small tasks around the construction site. Many male children are brought to work sites to assist their fathers. Day Laborer's chosen to work on rebuilding a house in Kabul.

 Day Laborer's chosen to build a wall in Kabul Afghanistan. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out  the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

Day Laborer's chosen to build a wall in Kabul Afghanistan. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

 Sanangon, from Mazar Sharif lays rock in a trench that will be the foundation of the house in Kabul.The entire construction of the house will be done by unregulated labor.

Sanangon, from Mazar Sharif lays rock in a trench that will be the foundation of the house in Kabul.The entire construction of the house will be done by unregulated labor.

 A man wades out of a pool while beign watched by an Afghan National Police man. Heightened security in Kabul the night before the election on Soviet Hill in Kabul Afghanistan, August 19th, 2009. The country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.

A man wades out of a pool while beign watched by an Afghan National Police man. Heightened security in Kabul the night before the election on Soviet Hill in Kabul Afghanistan, August 19th, 2009. The country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.

 Afghans gather on a Friday on Nadir Shah Hill, or Kite Hill- to fly paper kites and battle others in a traditional match. When a Kite is cut children with long brooms have to catch the kites before their prize blows away. Kite flying is a popular recreation for Afghan children

Afghans gather on a Friday on Nadir Shah Hill, or Kite Hill- to fly paper kites and battle others in a traditional match. When a Kite is cut children with long brooms have to catch the kites before their prize blows away. Kite flying is a popular recreation for Afghan children

Lake Qargha 9km from Kabul, makes a great afternoon getaway from the city. Quarga is a man-made lake created by the damming of the Kabul river and is a lovely recreational place for Afghans with clean water for swimming, paddle boats, motor boats and places for families to gather and picnic.

Lake Qargha 9km from Kabul, makes a great afternoon getaway from the city. Quarga is a man-made lake created by the damming of the Kabul river and is a lovely recreational place for Afghans with clean water for swimming, paddle boats, motor boats and places for families to gather and picnic.

A man sells old corn-on-the-cob in the Macroyan 2 evening market while women behind him peruse the used clothing stands. Macroyan is known as one of the more progressive neighborhoods where the middle-class live in soviet style apartment complexes.

A father and son metalworking team work in downtown Kabul. The rate for skilled labor is 5 dollars a day and trades are traditionally handed down through the family.

A burka clad woman purchases a calf head for a soup in a busy market near the Old City of Kabul, Afghanistan.

Kabul children, off for winter vacation play in the snow of the Shohadaie Saliheen Cemetery of Kabul, Afghanistan. Interestingly cemeteries are very social places in Afghanistan and are common for recreation.

Children play Carambol in Cinema Park in Kabul. Mavid, age 12 right is playing Ravi, age 6. Though Ravi is the youngest and smallest player he has won his fifth straight game.

Kabul City Center, Afghanistan's first modern shopping center is a nine stories tall in the posh section of Shar-e-now, Kabul Afghanistan. Security is heavy and shoppers are profiled, and must be well-heeled to be allowed entrance.

Children play on the grass at Bagh-e Babur historic park in Kabul Afghanistan while mothers watch nearby. The park is also the last resting-place of the first Mughal emperor Babur.

A man feeds the birds outside of a mosque near the Kabul River in the old city of Kabul, Afghanistan.

Yama Ismail plays Snooker at Target Game Zone in Haki Yqoob Square, Kabul Afghanistan. Snooker is a popular game for upper-class afghanis. The Snooker halls come alive after work hours are over also Tournaments are very popular.

Boys and men play football in an empty pool at the top of Wazir Akbahan Hill. The pool was built by the soviets during their short occupation. Kabul, Afghanistan.

A Hazara girl and her mother visit a cemetery in Kabul, Afghanistan. Thursday evening's is the traditional time to visit cemeteries as it is the night before Friday- the traditional holy day for Muslims.

Girls visit a Shrine near Karga Lake outside of Kabul, Afghanistan.

A sikh medicine man in his shop in downtown Kabul, Afghanistan.

A sikh girl plays with her little brother in Kabul, Afghanistan. Many Sikh's including boys don't attend school in Afghanistan as they are marginalized in the community. Homeschooling is not an option as many parents have not attended schooling either.

A deaf man prays at the grave for his relative.

A man in traditional dress in a market in downtown Kabul. Most markets are unorganized and unregulated in Kabul as many salesmen cannot afford shops.

A car wash in the Kart-E Sakhi section of Kabul Afghanistan. It costs 150 AFS (roughly 3.00 USD) to wash a car in Kabul. The workers earn about 600 AFS or 12 dollars a day and work year round despite the sub-zero temperatures.

Girls play volleyball in the Olympic Stadium's Women's Gym in Kabul Afghanistan. The girls come three times a week to play volleyball against each other as there is no other team in the country. Coach Abdul Hamid Sufi says that the girls are more interested in volleyball than the boys, and volunteer's his time as the Afghan government does not support the women's team.

Afghan youth supporters of Dr. Abdullah Abdullah at a political rally at the Kabul Stadium in Kabul Afghanistan on August 17th, 2009. the country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.

Afghans vote at schools across Kabul Afghanistan on August 20th, 2009. the country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.

Girls on the street in the upscale Shar-e-now section of Kabul. There are many restaurants in the area featuring separate seating sections for men and women.

A Hazara funeral in Kabul, Afghanistan. In Afghanistan and most Muslim countries it is required to bury the dead before sunset and family members assist in the burial. Only men attend the event and women mourn at home.

A Hazara funeral in Kabul, Afghanistan. In Afghanistan and most Muslim countries it is required to bury the dead before sunset. Only men attend the burial and women mourn at home. The man on the left is the deceased son.

Day laborers wait outside the Pashto Market in downtown Kabul hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

Day laborers fight for the chance to work with a contractor outside the Pashto Market in downtown Kabul hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

Suffroz (right) and his assistant wait outside the Pashto market in downtown Kabul, hoping to be chosen to work for the day. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

A workers son wets the rocks to cut down on dust and works on other small tasks around the construction site. Many male children are brought to work sites to assist their fathers. Day Laborer's chosen to work on rebuilding a house in Kabul.

Day Laborer's chosen to build a wall in Kabul Afghanistan. Workers make 250 Afghans (3-5 dollars) a day and often come from provinces in Afghanistan to seek out the unregulated labor market and often live in squalid conditions in order to send more money home.

Sanangon, from Mazar Sharif lays rock in a trench that will be the foundation of the house in Kabul.The entire construction of the house will be done by unregulated labor.

A man wades out of a pool while beign watched by an Afghan National Police man. Heightened security in Kabul the night before the election on Soviet Hill in Kabul Afghanistan, August 19th, 2009. The country later went on to elect incumbent president Hamid Karzai after months of debate over a tampered election.

Afghans gather on a Friday on Nadir Shah Hill, or Kite Hill- to fly paper kites and battle others in a traditional match. When a Kite is cut children with long brooms have to catch the kites before their prize blows away. Kite flying is a popular recreation for Afghan children

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